The Unforgettable ‘Desert Journey’

I have been into trying all kinds of genres of music though, the one genre I’m still skeptical of listening to is hardcore metal. My system isn’t pure enough to indulge into something that involves too much of a person. From local to the international scene, I have hand-picked the music I religiously listen to. Mekaal Hassan, Junoon, Gabriel, Pink Floyd or Zappa each one of these has its own significance, down the memory lane.

Following my daily ritual of aimlessly refreshing my newsfeeds and switching songs over Youtube, I was suggested to go over a song and where you get intrigued by the thumbnail of the video, ‘The Desert Journey’ by The D/A Method a song with a Wilaiti (foreign) title and a Desi (local) video kind of worked as a ‘click-bait’. The video, in itself, is a musical journey that highlights the regret underlying the long-awaited freedom.

The journey to know more about the band landed me from their Youtube channel to Facebook. A quick scroll down the feed explained that D/A Method had been busy creating music since 2012 and are heavily inspired by some of the most invincible musical souls known to man. Having released their first album, The Great Disillusion back in 2015 they have now released the second album that has been recorded and mastered, by Bruce Soord the man behind The Pineapple Thief, Wisdom of Crowds.

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 If you’re planning to catch up on a unique experience with the vision to support the epic musical scene in Pakistan than you’d be glad to know that D/A Method is just about to have their concert at the launch of their second album titled, ‘The Desert Road‘ for which they had an amazing video released beforehand. The concert is taking place on the 20th of September, 2017 and the venue is Bahria Karsaz Auditorium. The deets of the event are present on their event page and the tickets which I just got to know myself, will be available at the venue. 

Planned it, yet?

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Coke Studio stuck between the Love & Hate Brigade

What’s music to you? For me, it’s something that I feed on when I’m happy, sad, excited or just bored. My music often defines what and how I think and take my decisions. It’s actually quite a lot for me and definitely for many. Coke Studio had been the biggest hope since a decade that brought back classics the younger generation never knew existed, revamped the entire South Asian music scene with some of the biggest fans resting in India.
Surprising enough, with a mega opening act the 10th season seems to have gotten stuck on an island surrounded by the super energetic waves of both positive and negative criticism. There’s more of a battle taking place across social media with KOLs, music enthusiasts and people who simply cannot resist the power of Coke Studio taking their opinions to another level!

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Why is that there’s so much disparity for this season? Starting off from the tales of Nepotism towards selecting singers that weren’t found too apt for the covers and, aahh…yes! Covers, ‘why does CS10 believe in opting for covers rather than producing originals’. There are too many tales to tally and I on the other hand just have a very basic opinion to not let the music die from the Pakistani industry once again. We have taken almost a decade to pick ourselves back again where the singles are making waves across. There’s always the good, the bad and even the ugliest (hear Sayoone) but there’s always a beauty to the difference of opinion that helps music aficionados to work harder and produce, richer!
All I’m afraid of is the time when Bilal and Faisal take off from CokeStudio with a broken heart like Rohail Hayatt 4 years ago. He said that he wasn’t but it was evident, he lost hope from the people for whom he created wonders for 6 whole years. Creations like ‘Alif Allah, Aik Alif, Bibi Sanam, Yaar Dadi, KirKir, Pyaar Naal, Aj Latha Naeeo, Jal Pari, Laila O Laila, Ishq Kinara where these are just a few that came from that 6-year long journey. For the hate, he received even from the Gems of the industry.

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Pakistan, criticise where it’s meant to be, say it out loud, but say it sanely. Your opinions make the judgment of many who rely on foreign opinions to try things out. Maybe you did take away the chance of someone actually enjoying a song that you didn’t like.

 

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You might know your music the way you hear it but you might not know the struggle behind its creation. You might say what sounds right to you, but you may be different than what the producers thought about their production!

Let music survive in Pakistan with your constructive criticism.